Reading List

2014

December

  • Books:
    1. David Byrne – How Music Works

November

  • Books:
    1. Lawrence Wright – Going Clear
    2. John Brunner – Stand On Zanzibar

October

September

  • Books:
    1. Judith Stein – Pivotal Decade
    2. Brown, et al – Make It Stick

July

March – June

  • Reading List:
    1. The Global Cold War (minor field exam list)
  • Books:
    1. Daniel Bell – The Coming Postindustrial Society
    2. Martin Campbell-Kelly, et al – Computer
    3. Jean-Francois Lyotard – The Postmodern Condition
    4. Michael A. Hiltzik, Dealers of Lightning
    5. Fred Turner – From Counterculture to Cyberculture
    6. Andrew Blum – Tubes
    7. Siva Vaidhyanathan – The Googlization of Everything
    8. Jaron Lanier – You Are Not a Gadget
  • Articles
    1. Jennifer Light – “When Computers Were Women”
    2. W. Barkley Fritz – “The Women of ENIAC”
    3. Tara McPherson – “U.S. Operating Systems at Mid-Century”
    4. Steven Lubar – “Do Not Fold, Spindle, or Mutilate”
    5. Paul Ceruzzi – “Inventing Personal Computing”
    6. Janet Abbate – “Privatizing the Internet”
    7. Danah Boyd – “White Flight in Networked Publics?”

January – March

2013

May – August

April

  • Books:
    1. Sharon Ghamari-Tabrizi – The Worlds of Herman Kahn
    2. Peder Anker – From Bauhaus to Eco-House
    3. Stafford Beer – Designing Freedom
    4. Rachel Carson – Silent Spring
    5. Jason L. Churchill – The Limits to Influence: The Club of Rome and Canada, 1968 to 1988 (Dissertation)
    6. George B. Dyson – Turing’s Cathedral: The Origins of the Digital Universe
  • Articles and Chapters:
    1. E.M. Tansey, “From the Germ Theory to 1945,” Irvine Loudon, ed., Western Medicine: An Illustrated History (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1997), pp. 102-122.
    2. Myron Echenberg, “Pestis Redux: the Initial Years of the Third Bubonic Plague Pandemic,” Journal of World History v 13 (2002), pp. 429-449.
    3. Matthew Connelly, “To Inherit the Earth. Imagining World Population from the Yellow Peril to the Population Bomb,” Journal of Global History v. 1 (2006), pp. 299-319.
    4. Matthew Connelly, Matt Fay, Giulia Ferrini, Micki Kaufman, Will Leonard, Harrison Monsky, Ryan Musto, Taunton Paine, Nicholas Standish, and Lydia Walker, “General, I Have Fought Just as Many Nuclear Wars as You Have”: Forecasts, Future Scenarios, and the Politics of Armageddon,” The American Historical Review 2012 117: 1431-1460.
    5. Sheila Jasanoff, “Image and Imagination: the Formation of Global Environmental Consciousness,” in Changing the Atmosphere: Expert Knowledge and Environmental Governance (Cambridge: MIT Press, 2001), pp. 309-337.
    6. Richard Grove, “Origins of Western Environmentalism,” Scientific American v. 267 (1992), pp. 42-47.
    7. Daniel Headrick, “Health, Medicine, and the New Imperialism, 1830-1914,” in Headrick, Power Over Peoples: Technology, Environments, and Western Imperialism, 1400 to the Present (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2010), pp. 226-256.
    8. David Arnold, “Medicine and Colonialism,” in W.F. Bynum and Roy Porter, eds., Companion Encyclopedia of the History of Medicine (London: Routledge, 1993X pp. 1393-1416.
    9. Mary Dobson, “Epidemics and the Geography of Disease,” in Irvine Loudon, ed., Western Medicine: An Illustrated History (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1997), pp 176-191.
    10. Anne-Emanuelle Birn, Yogan Pillay, and Timothy Holtz, “The Political Economy of Health and Development,” in Textbook of International Health: Global Health in a Dynamic World (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009), pp. 132-191.
    11. Arthur Kleinman, “What is Specific to Western Medicine,” in W.F. Bynum and Roy Porter, eds., Companion Encyclopedia of the History of Medicine (London: Routledge, 1993), pp. 15-23.
    12. Roy Porter, “The Roots of Medicine,” in Porter, The Greatest Benefit to Mankind: A Medical History of Humanity (New York: Norton, 1997), pp. 14-43.

March

February

January

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